Good times, Stories, Travel Stories, Uncategorized, Writers/writing

To the High Desert of Santa Fe, New Mexico, we journey…

 

… At the B19 Gate in the Phoenix Airport- American Airlines. Waiting for the flight to Santa Fe to arrive, then from the Santa Fe airport to a shuttle for a ride to St John’s College and check-in for The Glen Workshop. Never expected to be here too early to get into the dorms ūüė≥but it just might happen! (Hope to include pictures of the Glen Workshop experience, but the WordPress mobile platform just crashed! Maybe pics can be edited in later…)

Uncategorized, Writers/writing

An introvert learns a lesson

"The Journey": Illustration depicts ...
“The Journey”: Illustration depicts a young boy absorbed in watching the scenery from his seat in a railway car for a series of poems by Josephine Preston Peabody entitled “The Little Past.” The poems relate experiences of childhood from a child’s perspective. Published in: “The Little Past : the Journey” by Josephine Preston Peabody, Harper’s magazine, 108:95 (Dec. 1903). 1 painting : oil. Digital file from original. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This morning early,¬†several women met to visit,¬†talk about writing, and to share something with the group¬†that they had written in the last three months. This was our second meeting. Our first meeting was to get to know each other a little bit and¬†to discuss what we hoped to gain from the group. I had some trepidations prior to the original meeting, mostly¬† because I am an introvert and find meetings like this to be difficult, ¬†but, to my surprise, ¬†the first gathering went very well. Even though none of us had the same type of writing goal in mind –¬†our interests¬†ran from¬†children’s books to non-fiction to public speaking to mysteries to¬†daily devotionals¬†– we hit it off so well¬†together that we decided to give the writing group idea a try.¬†Before the meeting ended that morning, we¬† gave ourselves an assignment in reading and writing, and set a date to gather together again.

As the weeks passed and the date to meet drew closer, I¬† got my assignments done, which was a great feeling, but then I began to¬†fret about the meeting. “Will¬†the other people¬†actually show up?” ” Why would anyone want to read my stuff?”¬†“Isn’t it kind of odd that writers, who work alone, should even get together?”,¬†etc. (For you extroverts, these kinds of statements¬†are¬†pretty typical examples of¬†introvert self-talk.)¬†Ultimately,¬†¬†I knew I could depend on one other person being there, and figured that if only she came, we could still have a great morning, and I tried to put my insecure-introvert¬†feelings aside.

Of course, all¬†the mental pacing was for naught – everyone showed up, people graciously read each other’s work, and the critiquing was kind and valuable. I shouldn’t have worried, and I now know why: even at our first meeting, when we realized none of us¬†was going to be writing in¬†the same¬†genre, we had a great time being together, sharing stories, encouraging one another as people first, writers second.¬†¬†We are¬†¬†a diverse group in age and experience, but because of that¬†there is a lot of wisdom¬†from which to draw.¬†¬†Our¬† prespectives, strengths and weaknesses were¬†mixed, balanced and blended as we shared our stories¬†of meeting¬†the¬†demands of daily life, and the¬†challenges of the writing life.

We plan to meet again next quarter, and as our level of trust and sharing grows, I believe our writing skills will be enhanced, too. Even though writing is a solitary, introvert-ish endeavor, I am beginning to learn the great blessings that comes from a writing group. Who knew?

Reviews, Writers/writing

What I learned from NaNoWriMo

Keyboard V
Keyboard V (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Not sure how I got swept up into the National Novel Writing Month in November, but it happened. If you are new to NaNoWriMo, their slogan is ‚ÄúThirty Days and Nights of Literary Abandon‚ÄĚ. ¬†The idea is to write a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. ¬†If you want to learn more about NaNoWriMo you can do that here: http://www.nanowrimo.org/faq/about-us/

NaNoWriMo is completely on the honor system. After all, if you lie about reaching your goal, who have you fooled? Only yourself, of course. So, did I reach 50,000 words? No. But I did write 41, 271 words, which completely surprised me. Here are the top 10 things I learned from participating in NaNoWriMo:

  1. The number of words you must write per day to reach 50,000 words in thirty days is 1,667, but you should set your sites on writing at least 2,000. You need a cushion to get you through the days when life, family, work or illness demands that you leave the computer and get other things done.
  2. Recognize the things that are writing aids, and which things are distractions; e.g., TV = distraction; radio = aid. Also, being a good typist is a great asset to have at your disposal. I‚Äėm a terrible typist.(Dragon speech recognition software anyone?)
  3. Find a comfortable place to write. This was a challenge. Never knew it was so hard to type with a computer on your lap. Couldn’t get used to my legs going numb after an hour of sitting cross legged.
  4.  Prepare an outline for the novel (fair according to the NaNoWriMo rules.) It is too time consuming to formulate an outline and write a story at the same time.
  5. Do not try to learn how to use Scrivener (a word-processing program designed for writers) and write 1667 words a day at the same time.
  6. Checking your progress on a fun website that has your personal total word count, a bar graph, and lots of other stats is cool, mostly.
  7. It is possible to write 3,000 words in 6 hours; also possible to type in a semi-sleeping state.
  8. It is very hard to lock your internal editor in a room in your brain and not allow her out for a month. Couldn’t do it.
  9. Yes, you can sit down and write even when inspiration has left the building.
  10.  You might want to take the last two days of November off work so that you can write for 48 hours straight, if necessary.

Will I do NaNoWriMo again? Can’t say, especially now that I¬†know how big the commitment is. I will be better prepared to participate if I do take the challenge next year, though.¬† How about you? Are you interested in joining NaNoWriMo 2013?

Uncategorized, Writers/writing

The strangest dream…

Writer's Stop

OK, must get this down before it fades away to nothing. Last night I¬† dreamed that I was writing a book, a mystery. The main character was an investigator, a man of medium height who had a buzzy-type haircut for his thick graying hair, and carried around a short tumbler of tonic water where ever he went. He was a friendly, quiet guy, and people seemed to genuinely like him. People did not expect much of him, however,¬†and he seemed to be a bit of a bungler,¬†was absent minded and¬†easily distracted. This character’s ‘assignment’¬†was to figure out how a local¬†lawyer was able to get the vast majority of¬†his clients acquitted without a trial.¬†Our hero¬†managed to solve the mystery, and cleverly;¬† so cleverly that the writer in my dream (me) was amazed and very impressed with him! (apparently this character in the book¬†figured things out without any help from the writer!) As can only happen in dreams, I was the writer of the book, the reader of the book, and was also watching the movie made from the book at the same time.
This was a whole new dream experience, and a couple of things stand out:

1.¬†I don’t think¬†of myself as a writer of books, and¬† have never been a writer in any other¬†dream.

2. Have never in my life featured a man as a main character in anything put into story form.

What does the dream mean?¬†No clue.¬†But it sure was fun to be able to read and write while sleeping! Now if I could just remember how¬†the main character¬†solved “The Mystery of the Quick Acquittals.”